Kip’s Comments 9-5-20

Green Heron in Tree - Image 650376 (© Kip Ladage)

 

Persistence

Over the past two or three weeks I have seen at least three green herons working along the Wapsipinicon River. Whether or not they nested here this year I do not know. What I can tell you is the birds seem to be very camera shy and have been challenging me to shoot even a “proof” shot that the birds are present. As of the time of this writing, I can tell you that I have looked for them via canoe and kayak twice today – each time paddling a mile or more upstream in addition to checking all of the backwater coves between here and my upstream limits. Like other days, I see the three in various locations, but none cooperate for a green heron photo session.   

This afternoon I achieved some semblance of success when I “camera-hunted” for a green heron again. While the image recorded certainly is not one of my better green heron photos, it does show that I was able to find and photograph one of the three elusive birds. I will continue to look for the herons while recognizing they will soon be heading south and out of my vision for another seven or eight months.  

Green Heron in Tree: 

Green Heron in Tree - Image 650376 (© Kip Ladage)

Green Heron in Tree – Image 650376 (© Kip Ladage)

 

During my pursuit of the small herons I readily found two species of shorebirds with multiples of each species to choose from for photographs.   

The easiest to capture digitally were the solitary sandpipers. As their name implies, you don’t see many together. With few together, that is less birds to become spooked and cause all to take flight.   

Solitary Sandpiper Along Wapsipinicon River:   

Solitary Sandpiper on Wapsipinicon River - Image 650279 (© Kip Ladage)

Solitary Sandpiper on Wapsipinicon River – Image 650279 (© Kip Ladage)

 

Solitary Sandpiper along Wapsipinicon River - Image 650487 (© Kip Ladage)

Solitary Sandpiper along Wapsipinicon River – Image 650487 (© Kip Ladage)

 

Found more in numbers were the killdeer. Apparently I was not too much of a threat since this young bird settled into the warm, moist sand as I pressed my shutter release button plenty of times. Perhaps when it matures it won’t behave so casually.   

Killdeer Along Wapsipinicon River:

Killdeer Along Wapsipinicon River - Image 650147 (© Kip Ladage)

Killdeer Along Wapsipinicon River – Image 650147 (© Kip Ladage)

 

Killdeer Along Wapsipinicon River - Image 650437 (© Kip Ladage)

Killdeer Along Wapsipinicon River – Image 650437 (© Kip Ladage)

     

Even though I have hundreds (maybe thousands) of painted turtle images, I still take a picture or two when the setting demands – such as today.   

Painted Turtles on Log:

Painted Turtle on Log - Image 650325 (© Kip Ladage)

Painted Turtle on Log – Image 650325 (© Kip Ladage)

 

Painted Turtles on Log - Image 650496 (© Kip Ladage)

Painted Turtles on Log – Image 650496 (© Kip Ladage)

 

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