Kip’s Comments 1-10-20

Barred Owl at Sweet Marsh - Image 604087 (© Kip Ladage)

 

Talking to the Animals

Often when I do nature photography presentations I dedicate some time to explain that if you understand the biology and patterns of wildlife, your chances of photographic opportunities are greatly increased. Sure, even if you are not too familiar with wildlife you may be able to grab a lucky photo once in a while, but to really increase your chances it helps to study the wildlife you wish to photograph. As you learn about your wildlife subjects, you quickly realize they tend to be predictable.

To improve your odds of shooting photos of at least one species, it helps if you talk to them, in their language of course. Today I am referring to barred owls.     

I know of an area claimed by a pair of barred owls. If or when other barred owls (or presumed to be barred owls) vocalize their presence, the resident birds quickly fly in to check out the intruder or guest – depending on their attitude. When I went out to “talk” to them today, I didn’t even realize the pair had moved in since you cannot hear owls when they fly. I just happened to look in the right direction and noticed an owl watching a human talk like an owl. Within a matter of minutes I recorded the following images of both birds in the pair.   

I am hopeful to find their nest soon so I can watch their parenting process when it begins.

Barred Owl at Sweet Marsh - Image 604025 (© Kip Ladage)

Barred Owl at Sweet Marsh – Image 604025 (© Kip Ladage)

 

Barred Owl at Sweet Marsh - Image 604087 (© Kip Ladage)

Barred Owl at Sweet Marsh – Image 604087 (© Kip Ladage)

 

Barred Owl at Sweet Marsh - Image 604113 (© Kip Ladage)

Barred Owl at Sweet Marsh – Image 604113 (© Kip Ladage)

 

Barred Owl at Sweet Marsh - Image 604124 (© Kip Ladage)

Barred Owl at Sweet Marsh – Image 604124 (© Kip Ladage)

 

Over the past few days I have been attempting a time-lapse recording of another hibscus blossom as it bloomed. This is my first attempt, so please pardon the roughness of the video. This video documents about 30-hours of time.

Hibiscus Bud Blooming Time Lapse Video

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