Kip’s Comments 6-5-19

Green Dragon Plant - Image 571837 (© Kip Ladage)

 

Green Dragon 

I remember as a child having Jack-in-the-Pulpit plants pointed out to me during walks in the timber. If my memory is correct, we even dug some in an effort to transplant them. I cringe now at that thought, but back then I did not know the difference. Fast-forward to a few years ago when I tossed some bright red Jack-in-the-Pulpit seeds in the yard, not knowing if they would take or not. Well, I can say without certainty we have Jack-in-the-Pulpits growing every year now. For reference sake, this is what a Jack-in-the-Pulpit looks like.

Jack-in-the-Pulpit at Ingawanis Woodlands - Image 569505 (© Kip Ladage)

Jack-in-the-Pulpit at Ingawanis Woodlands – Image 569505 (© Kip Ladage)

       

Within the not too distant past I was introduced to another wild plant that thrives in a wet, shady, forest-type environment, like the Jack-in-the-Pulpit. That plant was the “Green Dragon.” My first introduction was to a single plant on private property. I never expected to see them anywhere else, other than on land owned by friends of ours.   

Imagine my surprise a year or two ago when I found another green dragon plant. My find did not occur when the plant was in its prime, but that was OK. I now knew where to look during subsequent years.   

I have been keeping an eye on the green dragon plants during this growing season and I am happy to report that there are not one, not two, but three in bloom right now. This is a picture of the largest blossom. I will continue to watch for even more of the very interesting plants.   

Green Dragon:   

Green Dragon Plant - Image 571837 (© Kip Ladage)

Green Dragon Plant – Image 571837 (© Kip Ladage)

 

If you would like to read more about the green dragon, click on this link:  https://ozarkedgewildflowers.com/spring-wildflowers/green-dragon-arisaema-dracontium/

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